Bias in research studies on food security

There is an ongoing debate among researchers regarding objectivity and value freedom. While some defend that researchers should be value free and try to avoid having any biases, others argue that there is no such thing as value freedom.

That is researchers should be aware of their existing biases and agendas, identify them and inform the other stakeholders in a research program. How would you handle your biases when planning a research program in food security?

Do you think they would be a hindrance or would they enrich the research if you are working with others who have different perspectives on a particular topic in food security? The objective of this topic is to encourage you explore how you would approach a research study in food security in order to ensure you identify the reality of the situation in a household or community.

#Bias #research #studies #food #security

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